Browser Wars Episode 2: Return of the Rebel

In an earlier birth, I was an ardent fan of the browser called Opera. I used it on all platforms, including Linux, till the version 6 – after which it became heavily bloated with Mail client, newsreader etc., The primary reason I liked it was because it was the only browser offering an MDI interface at that juncture. Then came the browser called Phoenix (which was later renamed to firebird and then firefox. Easily the most renamed mainstream software ever!).

These days I do occassionally use firefox, but my browser of choice is the one from the dark world. I hate switching browsers just because a page is not getting rendered properly on a certain browser. Though IE is not technically the most sophisticated browser on earth, (that honour should still go to Opera 8, I feel. The Norwegian company is the most innovative among all browser makers. Incidentally, Opera is the browser of choice on my Krome IQ 700, though Pocket IE is also available) it has the best compatibility with websites. Of course, it is because webmasters always target the most used browser. One thing I miss in the IE browser is the tabbed interface. Though you have the option of using browsers like Avant, MyIE etc., which use the IE rendering and provide tabbed browsing, I dislike their amateurish user interface.

I am sure M$ will come up with a tabbed interface on IE 7, but if you want to experience it today, you have the most unlikely candidate offering the feature today- Netscape 8!

M$ Homepage on Netscape 8

Netscape has replaced their core with Firefox(previously it was Mozilla) and also gives you the option of using the IE core. That’s a double bonanza- you get the best of both worlds in one single interface. I immediately fell in love with this browser which also has a very unique user interface. You even have the option of using different engines for different tabs.

The default behaviour of the tabs is slightly confusing. For example, when you close a tab, the focus shifts to the last accessed tab than the immediate left. But these kind of quirks can easily be controlled using the options dialog.

Download and try for yourself!

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2 thoughts on “Browser Wars Episode 2: Return of the Rebel

  1. In an earlier birth, I was an ardent fan of the browser called Opera. I used it on all platforms, including Linux, till the version 6 – after which it became heavily bloated with Mail client, newsreader etc.

    First of all the mail client is only about 350kb of Opera’s 3.7mb installation file.

    Second, starting with Opera 8, both the mail client and newsreader are not enabled by default. It’s included with the installation, but you can’t use it until you tell the browser you want to use it.

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